Sweet Potato chapati

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BM# 97: Week 2, Day 3
Theme : Vegan recipes

I have been making a whole lot of Vegan recipes for this theme but unfortunately I don’t seem to be able to take pictures. The weather is now bad and before I know it, it’s dark outside and there is no light to take pictures. If I take pictures indoors, the colors don’t come out right. So that’s something I have given up doing a long time back.

Initially i was planning to post the recipe of a vegan cake I had made sometime back. Unfortunately the frosting had butter in it. Coming to think of it, its easy to make a vegan cake, but vegan frosting can be much harder.

Anyway I decided on this sweet potato chapatis for today. It’s been in my drafts folder for a while. My cousin has made this for us when we were in our Velacheri house. I still remember how soft and delicious it was. Mine didn’t turn out to be as good as hers but still it was pretty good. I forgot her recipe so this recipe is from the internet. These chapatis turn out to be very soft. The spice level can be adjusted to your preference. I like it flavored only with chili powder, but you can try adding whatever spices you like.

Read on for the recipe.

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Recipe adapted from: Archana’s kitchen

Sweet potato roti:

  • 1 cup cooked and mashed sweet potato
  • 1 cup wheat flour
  • 1.5 teaspoon red chili powder, or per taste
  • Salt as needed

Method:

    Pressure cook sweet potatoes. Once completely cooked and cooled down, peel and mash them. For every cup of wheat flour, add one cup of mashed sweet potatoes.
    In a big mixing bowl, add the mashed sweet potatoes, flour, chili powder and salt. You can add a teaspoon each of cumin seeds and ajwain(carom seeds) too, if preferred. Mix everything and make a smooth and soft dough, sprinkling water as needed to bring the dough together. Don’t add too much water in one shot, add a little at a time, mix in and add more if needed.
    Once the dough comes together and is soft and not lumpy anymore, cover the bowl and leave it to rest for 10-15 minutes.
    Make chapatis. I suggest watching a video in YouTube if you are not familiar with the making chapatis.Serve with pickle or a curry of your choice.

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM#97

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Chena puzhukku – Green gram dal with elephant yam

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For the third day of serving root vegetables for the blog, I am here with elephant yam cooked with green gram dal along with ground coconut. This puzhukku was a new find for me, though we have had a fair share of kappa puzhukku (tapioca cooked and mashed a bit).

Elephant yam was a staple in my father’s childhood days it seems. Most of the veggies came from the backyard those days and these grew pretty easily. He tells us that the first time ever he saw cauliflower or cabbage was when he came to Chennai for his job, at the age of 19. Keep in mind that we are taking about late 1950s.

Today I see cauliflower a lot more than yam in the supermarkets. The ones here are picked from the frozen section. Even back home, I prefer to stay away from the vegetable as its a pain to clean it up. Root vegetables in general need a little more extra attention while cleaning up.Now if someone (like my dad, of course), takes care of the cleaning part, I like cooking and eating it :D.

Read on for the pictorial and the recipe.

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Pictorial:

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Pressure cook 1/2 cup green gram dal with 2 cups of diced elephant yam for 3-4 whistles. Let the pressure drop naturally.

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Grind together 3/4 cup coconut, 2-3 garlic pods, 2 green chillies (or per taste), 1 teaspoon jeer seeds using a little water to a paste.

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In a big pan, heat 1 teaspoon of oil. Add a teaspoon of mustard seeds and 1 dry red chilli.

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Once the seeds splutter, add the cooked green gram and yam mix. Add salt as needed and 1/2 teaspon turmeric powder. Pour some water if the mix is too dry – about 1/2 cup or so.

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Add the ground coconut paste and mix it in. Let it cook for 5 minutes. Taste test and adjust. Take off the heat. Ideally this is served with kanji/congee, but my husband is not a big fan of that – so this was paired with rice and rasam.

Recipe source: Chena puzhukku

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup green gram dal (pacha payaru)
  • 2 cups elephant yam, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • salt

For grinding:

  • 3/4 cup coconut grated
  • 2-3 garlic pods
  • 2 green chilies
  • 1 teaspoon jeera (cumin seeds)

For tadka:

  • 1 teaspoon oil
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 dry red chili

Method:

  1. Pressure cook 1/2 cup green gram dal with 2 cups of diced elephant yam for 3-4 whistles. Let the pressure drop naturally.
  2. Grind together 3/4 cup coconut, 2-3 garlic pods, 2 green chillies (or per taste), 1 teaspoon jeer seeds using a little water to a paste.
  3. In a big pan, heat 1 teaspoon of oil. Add a teaspoon of mustard seeds and 1 dry red chilli.
  4. Once the seeds splutter, add the cooked green gram and yam mix. Add salt as needed and 1/2 teaspon turmeric powder. Pour some water if the mix is too dry – about 1/2 cup or so.
  5. Add the ground coconut paste and mix it in. Let it cook for 5 minutes. Taste test and adjust. Take off the heat. Ideally this is served with kanji/congee, but my husband is not a big fan of it so this was paired with rice and rasam.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for recipes from other participants.

Radish Sambar

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Life keeps happening and sometimes I am a little late to catch up with the events.

Last October, I had a mail from a magazine editor from middle east to feature one of my pictures as their cover page. I was humbled, I was honored and of course, I agreed. The only drawback was that I didn’t have a high-resolution copy of the picture she wanted. It was taken in Chennai and so my hard disk back up was also there. I couldn’t get it done despite my two friends and my husband helping me with the resolution. Finally, I just gave it up and asked her to see if she can get it fixed. And I left it at that.

On a fine day a couple of months later, I sent a mail to know whether they really published the picture or not. They said they did and sent me a soft copy of the same. Another friend have picked up a copy of that issue for me now. It was a problem since I was looking for an edition 2-3 months after it was published.

Anyway long story short, I learned my lessons.

  1. Click high quality pictures
  2. Take online back ups regularly for each and every picture.

And another thing I did was to invest in some props. I had very few props with me. True, I am not earning an income from this space, but my pictures are getting published and there is a lot to be proud about that!

Coming to the pictures here, this was the first click I did with all my new set of wooden painted backgrounds and some new props. I know it doesn’t look fantastic or even meaningful (sambar and flowers?!?! Really!!??), but I am looking at it as practice sessions. And the more I use the props, the less guilty I feel. All these boards, even the bright red one below have been given more makeovers, so it doesn’t look all that bad.

Enjoy this serving of root vegetables in warm new set up and brand new props :-).

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BM #61; Week 4; Theme : Root vegetables

Pictorial:

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Makes about four servings. Slice 6-7 small radishes into thin rounds and pressure cook with 1/2 cup toor or moong dal.

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Add 1/4 teaspoon of turmeric powder, 2-3 green chillies, radish greens if you have them and enough water to cover it. Pressure cook for 3-4 whistles until the dal is cooked completely.

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Once the dal is cooked and taken out of the cooker, add 3 cups of water to a pan. Add 4-5 curry leaves, 1 teaspoon of tamarind paste and two teaspoons of sambar powder.

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Mix well and bring to a boil. Let it boil for 6-8 minutes for the tamarind to cook completely.

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Add salt to taste, cooked dal and radish.

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Bring to a rolling boil, add a handful of coriander leaves as well.

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Prepare a tadka with a spoon of mustard seeds, few curry leaves,a good pinch of hing and 1 dry red chilli. Once the seeds splutter, add it to the prepared sambar. Mix well and serve with rice and a vegetable on the side.

Makes about four servings.

Ingredients:

  • 6-8 small radishes
  • 1/2 cup toor dal or moong dal
  • 2-3 green chillies (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 3 cups water
  • 2 teaspoons sambar powder
  • 1 teaspoon tamarind paste
  • 4-5 curry leaves, optional
  • handful of coriander leaves, optional
  • salt

For tadka:

  • 1 teaspoon oil
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 2-3 curry leaves
  • good pinch hing
  • 1 dry red chili

Method:

  1. Slice 6-7 small radishes into thin rounds and pressure cook with 1/2 cup toor or moong dal. Add 1/4 teaspoon of turmeric powder, 2-3 green chillies, radish greens if you have them and enough water to cover it. Pressure cook for 3-4 whistles until the dal is cooked completely.
  2. Once the dal is cooked and taken out of the cooker, add 3 cups of water to a pan. Add 4-5 curry leaves, 1 teaspoon of tamarind paste and two teaspoons of sambar powder.
  3. Mix well and bring to a boil. Let it boil for 6-8 minutes for the tamarind to cook completely.
  4. Add salt to taste, cooked dal and radish.
  5. Bring to a rolling boil, add a handful of coriander leaves as well.
  6. Prepare a tadka with a spoon of mustard seeds, few curry leaves,a good pinch of hing and 1 dry red chilli. Once the seeds splutter, add it to the prepared sambar. Mix well and serve with rice and a vegetable on the side.

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