Indian Food Odyssey : One state at a time

A recap of the 30 day Indian Food Odyssey. Click the link/picture to go the particular post.

Andhra Pradesh:

andhra

Arunachal Pradesh: Thukpa

W

Assam: Simple Lunch Platter

assamese-003

Bihar : A mini lunch with Sattu ka Bharta 

bihari-005 

Chhattisgarh : Pancharatna Dal 

chhattisgarh-001 

Delhi: A glimpse of street food 

delhi11 

A lunch platter from Goa

goan1-001 

Gujarat : Mini Thali

gujarati-002

Haryana : Halwa Poori Chhole

haryana-001

Himachal Pradesh : Meetha rice, Madra, Khatta and sweet chhole

himachal-005

Jammu and Kashmir : A mini platter

 

kashmir-001

Jharkhand: Chilka roti and chana dal ki chutney

       

jharkhand

Karnataka Oota: Mini Meals

karnataka-003 

Kerala : A traditional breakfast

Kerala-005

Madhya Pradesh : Indori Poha, Jalebi and Bhutte ki khees

Madhya_pradesh

Maharashtra: Poori bhaji Thali

puri-004

Manipur : Mini meals

manipuri-003

Meghalaya:

meghalaya-002

Mizoram: Cauliflower Stalk Bai

mizo_bai-001

Nagaland: Dal with phool gobi and Naga chutney

nagaland

Orissa: Odia thali 

oriya-005

Pondicherry: Simple Meals

pondicherry-007

Punjab da Khana

Punjab-005

 

The desert state of Rajasthan

rajasthani-001 

Sel roti from Sikkim

sikkim 

Pongal meals from Tamil Nadu

pongalfood (2)

Tripura Khichuri Bhog

tripura-002

Awadh Mini Thali from Uttar Pradesh

 

up_thali-005

Uttarakhand Mini Meals

uttarakhand

West Bengal: Luchi, Doi dharosh and Tok dal

bengal-002

Advertisements

Bengal : Luchi, Doi Dharosh and Aamer Dal

bengal-001

From April first, the Blogging Marathon participants have been traversing through most of the Indian states (and some Union territories) trying out the regional food, one state at a time.

The final stop is at West Bengal and this is what I have prepared for the state. Check out the other Bengali recipes at the end of the post.

bengal-003

The posts done till now were prepared from the month of February and so all I had to do was schedule the posts to go live on that particular day. But unfortunately for Bengal, I kept procrastinating until the end. So April 30th came and went and I was still clueless about what to prepare.

I had bought some ready made rasgolla with an idea to prepare cheater’s rasmalai and to end the month long marathon on a sweet note. But then some ideas just don’t materialize…in this case, the idea(rasgolla) got eaten as such before I could improvise it as rasmalai.

bengal

The good thing was the rest of the participants did their share of Bengali dishes and I was able to browse through each of them and finalize mine. After ruling out rasmalai and the chanar payesh, which some had prepared, I decided on Vaishali’s Tauk dal and doi dharosh. It’s hardly surprising, given that I have already done three states (Gujarat, Delhi, UP and now Bengal) based on her blog :-).

It was also kind of in line with the lunch platter theme I was preparing for all the other states. So, tauk dal and doi dharosh it is…along with luchis and the left over ready made rasgollas. For the luchis, I prepared a corn kurma as a side dish. It’s not a Bengali recipe.

bengal-005

The Menu:

  • Doi Dharosh : Okra cooked in yogurt. This is a combination with Tok dal
  • Aamer Dal / Tok Dal/ Tauk Dal : Lentils with green mangoes and tempered with panch phoron.
  • Luchi :  Deep fried pooris made of all purpose flour.
  • Rice
  • Rasgolla : A Bengali sweet prepared of fresh paneer (or chena as it’s called) and soaked in sugar syrup. The ones here are ready made.
  • Corn Coconut Milk Kurma : This dish is NOT Bengali. I served it along with Luchi as there was no potatoes to make aloo dum.
  • Chili and Lemon wedge : on the side.

This is a picture of a Bengali Thali I had prepared two years back :-). Check out here for more pictures and the recipe links. bengali thali

bengal-002
Some more Bengali recipes in this space:

Uttar Pradesh : Awadh Mini Thali

up_thali-004

We have reached the fag-end of the state wise culinary journey and today, we are in Uttar Pradesh. Regular day-to-day lunch is the common dal-chawal-subzi-roti combination (Rice with dal, roti and veggies), so I thought I would turn to the capital city Lucknow’s rich Awadhi cuisine.

Just like how I turned to Vaishali’s space for the Gujarati thali and the Delhi food fare, her Awadhi Thali was the first thing to come to my mind once I finalized on the Lucknowi food.

up_thali-002

Awadh is the current Lucknow (and some surrounding regions) now and is known for its royal Nawabs and rich food fit for the kings. Dum style cooking (slow covered cooking over low fire) is what the place is most famous for.

This is what the wiki says: “The bawarchis and rakabdars of Awadh gave birth to the dum style of cooking or the art of cooking over a slow fire, which has become synonymous with Lucknow today. Their spread consisted of elaborate dishes like kebabskormasbiryani, kaliya, nahari-kulchas, zarda, sheermal, roomali rotis, and warqi parathas. The richness of Awadh cuisine lies not only in the variety of cuisine but also in the ingredients used like muttonpaneer, and rich spices including cardamom and saffron. “

up_thali-001

The thali here is a simple affair with a nawabi pulao that’s cooked in milk. Sultani dal is nothing but toor dal made rich with yogurt, cream and milk. Mattar ka nimona which is a green peas preparation. The bhindi is cooked in dum, though I couldn’t make out too much of taste difference.

Boondi ka raita is a simple yogurt prepared with ready made boondi(gram flour mini dumplings).

The lachha paratha is a favourite with my son. The rice too turned out to be good for my son since it was not spicy.

up_thali

Thali idea : Ribbons To Pastas

The Menu:

  • Nawabi Pulao : A simple pulao cooked in milk. I added the vegetables too at the time of cooking itself. This is then layered and baked later.
  • Sultani dal : A toor dal preparation made rich by the addition of yogurt, milk and cream
  • Dum Bhindi : Bhindi curry, cooked dum style
  • Mattar ka nimona : Green peas curry
  • Boondi raita : Gram flour dumplings (boondi) in yogurt. A simple raita
  • Lachha Paratha : A layer pattered paratha.
  • Salad : Onion rings and lemon wedges

up_thali-003

up_thali-005

 

Sikkim : Sel roti/ sael roti

sikkim-002

I remember the time I started making rotis/chapatis. The game that we had was “Guess the shape!”

India map was the most common one, but animal shapes like kangaroo or cheetah too weren’t uncommon. We used to have a lot of fun, letting our imagination run wild, while savouring those out of shape rotis. The good thing was, no matter what the shape is, the taste was fine.

Now when I roll out chapatis, it doesn’t come as a perfect circle, but it’s stopped being closer to a square! So I am happy…

Coming to these Sel rotis, which are quite popular in Sikkim, the shape is nowhere close to how it should look like! But again, the taste was fine, so I guess, it’s ok…for a first trial, at least.

sikkim-001

While looking for Sikkim recipes, I came across this NDTV article which talks about the culinary changes that has come over the place. There was a mention about Sel roti in there and that helped me decide the menu.

A bit more digging showed that Sel roti is originally from Nepal and is eaten with potatoes in various forms, aloo ko achar being one amongst many. This is a nice post about Sel rotis.

Though I tried the given combination of potato and sel roti, with yogurt, I couldn’t understand the combination-connection. The sel roti was great, the potato was great, but there was no chemistry between the two!

May be, these are acquired tastes or may be I should try out the original before passing that statement :-).

I loved the Sel roti, despite its poor shape. I first used a coke bottle and the batter oozed out completely. Then I used a squeezable ketch up bottle, that’s how I got the wriggly Sel rotis. I tried pouring from my hand as well. The shape wasn’t great, but it wasn’t bad either.

sikkim (2)

 

The Menu:

sikkim-003

sikkim